Billings Couple Finds Nearly 100-year Old NICU Incubator in Shed Behind Home

NICU Isolette

For many people, moving into a new home can cause quite a bit of stress and anxiety. For Natalie Saur of Billings, this was the complete opposite. She had moved into a new home with her family in 2013 and went through the typical steps of cleaning, unpacking and organizing.

When they toured the home for the first time, they noticed a large, metal tub sitting in the shed behind the house. After further examination and later finding the lid to the container, the Saur’s found that it was an antique infant incubator, one of about five throughout the world.

“When we saw the incubator, we didn’t think anything of it because we didn’t know what it was,” said Saur. “It’s in great shape and surreal to find such a thing here in Billings.  The lid of the incubator indicated that it was designed in 1923 by Dr. Julius Hess, who is considered the father of Neonatology.”

Over the past hundred years, NICU technology has increased substantially and now has the capability to provide humidity, sense the baby's temperature, take the child’s weight, and provide an adequate amount of temperature to maintain a normal temperature.

The house was built in 1910 and occupied for several years by another family before the Saurs moved into it.

Click here to view the KULR8 News coverage.

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